The Writing For Pleasure Centre’s Complete Programme Of Study

This programme of study is suitable for EYFS-KS2 (2-11 year olds).

How our programme of study fulfils the objectives of The EYFS Statutory Framework and Development Matters

Curriculum objectiveHow it is achieved
Write simple phrases and sentences that can be read by others.Every day, children are expected to make books. 

Children are taught early that a book should typically have a picture and a phrase/sentence on each page.

Teachers teach a variety of encoding strategies and how to write ‘sound spellings’ using the lessons provided in our Class Writing Projects and our Big Book Of Writing Mini-Lessons.
Write short sentences…using a capital letter and full stop.Children are taught to check that their book is finished by using the Is My Book Finished? poster. This poster includes checking that their book has capital letters and fullstops in it. 

In addition, children can be given a proof-reading checklist to complete. Examples of what these can look like are in our Class Writing Projects material. 
Encourage children to draw freely.Children are taught early that a book should typically have a picture and phrase/sentence on each page.
Write some or all of their name.Children are taught early that a book should always have the author’s name on the front. 

Children are taught to check their book is finished by using the Is My Book Finished? poster. This poster includes checking that their name is on the front of their book.
Additional inclusion made by the WfP Centre 

Explore the composition of numbers to 10.
Children are taught early that a book should have it’s ‘birth date’ on the front. Children should copy the date from the board and put it on the front of their books. E.g. ‘24/06/22’.
Additional inclusion made by the WfP Centre 

Do they use finger spaces?
This is regularly taught as a mini-lesson by teachers.

In addition, children can be given a checklist to complete which can include this requirement.
Additional inclusion made by the WfP Centre

Have they used conjunctions? (and, but, because)
We’ve found that by making books every day, children naturally begin to use these conjunctions when writing or telling their books to others.

In addition, the use of these conjunctions is regularly modelled in the books teachers make for their pupils. 
Additional inclusion made by the WfP Centre

Do they make changes to their writing before they publish it (add pages, add to their drawings and make writing changes)?
Children are taught to check their book is finished by using the Is My Book Finished? poster. This encourages children to go back and make changes to their books. 

Children are encouraged to talk with their teacher and friends during the book-making process. This regularly results in children making changes to their drawings and writing.

Teachers undertake daily Pupil-Conferencing with their pupils.

In addition, when they are emotionally mature and cognitively ready, children can be given a book-making checklist. The process of checking their book against the checklist encourages them to make changes. Examples of what these checklists can look like come as part of our Class Writing Project resources
Re-read what they have written to check that it makes sense.Children are taught that once they have published a book they should find a friend to read it with.

Children are encouraged to talk with their teacher and friends during the book-making process. 

Teachers undertake daily Pupil-Conferencing with their pupils.

At the end of each daily book-making session, time is devoted to Author’s Chair. This is an opportunity for children to share their books with their classmates. 

Children’s finished books are placed in the class library for others to read. In addition, opportunities for children to make books for people beyond their classroom are built into our book-making projects
Spell words by identifying sounds in them and representing the sounds with a letter or letters.Using our Class Writing Projects and the mini-lessons supplied in our Big Book Of Mini-Lessons, children are regularly taught a variety of encoding strategies. 

Teachers regularly model encoding strategies when conferencing and book-making with groups of children.

Children are provided with sound mats and common word lists when book-making.

Teachers always look to make links between their phonics instruction and how children can encode during daily book-making time.
Write recognisable letters, most of which are correctly formed.Letter formation is linked to daily phonics instruction. Children have a daily opportunity to write during book-making. 

Letters are on display and supplied as a visual aid through sound-mats and common word lists. 
Additional inclusion made by the WfP Centre 

– Do their non-fiction books follow a theme?

– Do their story books carry a plot?

– Do they enjoy generating their own writing ideas and making books?

– Do they make books outside of writing workshop time? E.g. in the Writing Centre
Children are taught to make different types of books throughout the year. These include: list books (also known as baby/board books), story and non-fiction books.

Children are taught to generate their own ideas for their books by having Idea Parties and by using the trade books that they love. 

Children have constant access to a high-quality and well stocked class library. Recommended trade books which can be looked at, discussed and read by the children are supplied with each Class Writing Project.

Children have constant access to a high-quality and well stocked Writing Centre. Children are taught how to use the Writing Centre. Children are also taught how they can take materials from the Writing Centre and use them in all the other areas. This is modelled to the children regularly by the teacher.

How our programme of study fulfils the KS1 objectives of The National Curriculum

Year One

Curriculum objectiveHow it is achieved
Pupils should be taught how to write sentences.Children are taught early into the year that a book should typically have a picture and a sentence(s) on each page.

In addition, children are taught lessons from our Sentence-Level Instruction publication. Children are expected to use and apply what they’ve just been taught during that day’s book-making time.
Pupils should be taught how to discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils.
Pupils should be taught how to read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher.
Children are encouraged to talk with their teacher and friends during the book-making process.

Teachers undertake daily Pupil-Conferencing with their pupils.

At the end of each daily book-making session, time is devoted to Author’s Chair. This is an opportunity for children to share their books with their class. 

Children are taught that once they have published a book, they should find a friend to read it with.

Children’s finished books are placed in the class library for others to read. In addition, opportunities for children to make books for people beyond their classroom are built into book-making projects
Pupils should be taught how to leave spaces between words.This is regularly taught as a mini-lesson by teachers. Children are expected to use and apply what’s been taught as a mini-lesson during that day’s book-making time.

In addition, children can be given a checklist to complete which can include this requirement. Examples of what these can look like are in our Class Writing Project material. 
Pupils should begin to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and end punctuation (full stop, question mark or exclamation mark).

Pupils should develop their understanding of how writers use a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week, and the personal pronoun ‘I’.
Children are taught early into the year that a book should typically have a picture and a sentence(s) on each page.

Children are taught lessons from our Sentence-Level Instruction publication. Children are expected to use and apply what they’ve just been taught during book-making time.

Children are taught lessons from our
Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply what they’ve just been taught during book-making time.

Multiple proof-reading sessions are planned for during Class Writing Projects. During these sessions, children systematically proof-read their books prior to publication using a process called CUPS. This includes sessions devoted to checking for capitalisation and end punctuation. 
Pupils should be taught to sit correctly at a table, holding a pencil comfortably and correctly; begin to form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place, and form capital lettersChildren should be provided with short but regular handwriting instruction. This is usually best done in conjunction with any phonics instruction. 

In addition, prior to publishing their books at the end of a Class Writing Project, children can be asked to pick a favourite page from their book to write up in their ‘best handwriting’. During these sessions, teachers should provide verbal feedback and individualised responsive handwriting instruction through Pupil-Conferencing.  
Additional inclusion made by the WfP Centre 

Write the date their book was ‘born’ on their front covers. E.g. 24/06/22
Children are taught early that a book should have it’s ‘birth date’ on the front. Children should copy the date from the board and put it on the front of their books. E.g. ‘26/06/22’.

Year Two

Curriculum objectiveHow it is achieved
Pupils should be taught to write for different purposes including: narratives, personal narratives and poetry.Our Class Writing Projects cover the major purposes for writing and come with both exemplar texts and suggested mentor trade texts.

Every day throughout EYFS and KS1, children will make books like the books they see and read in the class library. They will make story, information, memoir and poetry books. 
Pupils should learn how to use expanded noun phrases to describe and specify.Children are taught lessons about expanded noun phrases from our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply  (independently) what they’ve just been taught during that day’s book-making time.
Pupils should be taught how they can plan what they are going to write about.As part of a Class Writing Project, sessions are planned which invite children to make their front covers. These are seen as important ‘planning’ sessions as children are being asked to focus on what their book is going to be about. 

In addition, children are taught to draw a picture on any new page before they begin writing. This helps children consider what they will write about on each page.

Alternatively, sessions are planned where children can draw all the pictures for their different pages prior to writing. Again, these drawings help children consider what they will write about on each page. 
Finally, our Big Book Of Mini-Lessons provides teachers with a whole host of developmentally appropriate planning strategies for a range of genres. Children are expected to use and apply a taught mini-lesson during that day’s book-making time.
Pupils should be taught how to encapsulate what they want to say, sentence by sentence.At this stage, children have been taught for multiple years that a book should typically have a picture and a sentence(s) on each page.

In addition, they will have internalised a variety of sentence-level strategies from our Sentence-Level Instruction publication.
Pupils should be taught to read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.For a number of years children have engaged in daily Author’s Chair. This is an opportunity for them to share their books with their classmates. 

Again, children will have internalised the expectation that once they have published a book, they should find a friend to read it with.
Pupils should be taught how to make simple additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing by evaluating their writing with the teacher and other pupils.Teachers should plan sessions where children are taught revision mini-lessons. Children are expected to use and apply a taught mini-lesson during that day’s book-making time. 

In addition, teachers should turn the Product Goals for a class writing project into a Revision Checklist for children to use. Children should ensure that their books include all the things on the checklist. Examples of what these checklists can look like are supplied in our Class Writing Project resources.

Finally, teachers will regularly suggest how children could make revisions to their books through their daily Pupil-Conferencing.
Pupils should learn how to use subordination and coordination. Teachers teach lessons about coordinating and subordinating conjunctions using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during book-making time.
Pupils should be taught how to proof-read for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation.Multiple proof-reading sessions are planned for during Class Writing Projects. During these sessions, children systematically proof-read their books prior to publication using a process called CUPS. This includes sessions devoted to checking for capitalisation, use of vocabulary, punctuation and spelling.
Pupils should be taught how to re-read their writing to ensure it makes sense and that verbs to indicate time are used correctly.
Pupils should learn how to use the present and past tenses correctly and consistently including the progressive form.
When required, teachers will provide sessions for children to check their books to ensure their tense use is correct and consistent.

A poster and other resources are supplied by the teacher to help children to be successful during these sessions.
Pupils should be taught how to leave spaces between words.This will have been taught regularly for a number of years and children will have produced countless books which required them to use finger spaces.

In addition, children can be given a checklist to complete which can include this requirement. Examples of what these checklists can look like are supplied in our Class Writing Project materials.
Pupils should develop their understanding of how writers use full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, and question marks.Teachers teach lessons about capitalisation and end punctuation using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during that day’s book-making time.
Pupils should develop their understanding of how writers use commas for lists and apostrophes for contracted forms and the possessive (singular).Teachers teach lessons about commas for lists, apostrophes for contracted forms, and apostrophes for singular possession using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during book-making time.
Pupils should be taught to spell by segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes.For a number of years, children have been taught a variety of encoding strategies and how to write ‘sound spellings’.

Teachers will use the lessons provided in our Big Book Of Writing Mini-Lessons. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve been taught during book-making time.
Pupils should learn new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are already known, and learn some words with each spelling, including a few common homophones.Multiple proof-reading sessions are planned for during Class Writing Projects. During these sessions, children systematically proof-read their books prior to publication using a process called CUPS. This includes sessions devoted to checking their spellings of common homophones. 

In addition, these homophones are on display for children to use during daily book-making time. 
Pupils should be taught to form lower-case letters of the correct size; start using some of the strokes needed to join letters; understand which letters are best left unjoined; write capital letters and digits correctly and use spacing between words.Children should be provided with short but regular handwriting instruction. This is usually best done in conjunction with any phonics instruction. 

In addition, prior to publishing their books at the end of a Class Writing Project, children can be asked to pick a favourite page from their book to write up in their ‘best handwriting’. During these sessions, teachers should provide verbal feedback and individualised responsive handwriting instruction through Pupil Conferencing.
Additional inclusion made by the WfP Centre 

Write the date their book was ‘born’ on their front covers. E.g. 24/06/22
Children are taught early that a book should have it’s ‘birth date’ on the front. Children should copy the date from the board and put it on the front of their books. E.g. ‘26/06/22’.

How our programme of study fulfils the KS2 objectives of The National Curriculum

Year Three & Year Four

Curriculum objectiveHow it is achieved
Pupils should be taught to plan their writing by discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.Teachers should ensure that any new Class Writing Project starts with a Writing Study week (also called a Genre Week). During this week, children should read and discuss a variety of mentor trade books and exemplar texts which match the kind of writing they are about to do. 

During these discussions, the class should produce a list of Product Goals (also called success criteria). These goals will reflect what the children think they need to do and include to write the best texts possible.
This list of Product Goals should inform the future writing lessons the teacher plans to teach for the project.
Pupils should revise their writing by assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements.Teachers should plan sessions where children are taught revision mini-lessons. Children are expected to use and apply a taught mini-lesson during writing time.

Teachers should ensure that children always leave their right-hand page free as their Revision & Trying Things Out Page.

During the revision stage of a Class Writing Project, teachers should turn the class’ Product Goals into a Revision Checklist. Children should be given a session(s) to ensure that their text has either included all the goals listed or else they have tried them out on their Revision & Trying Things Out Page.

Finally, teachers will regularly suggest how children could try things out and make revisions to their writing through their daily Pupil-Conferencing.
Pupils should be taught to create settings, characters and plot in narratives.We have a clear vision of progression for children’s narrative writing. This can be seen in our Writing Development Scales & Assessment Framework publication. 

Importantly, all our narrative Class Writing Projects come with a series of literary lessons which help children create settings, characters and plot in their narratives. These lessons should be used and applied (independently) by children during writing time.
Pupils develop their understanding of how to punctuate direct speech.Teachers teach lessons about using and punctuating speech using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during writing time.

In addition, children are given multiple sessions to proof-read their manuscripts prior to final publication. This means children are given an explicit opportunity to ensure that any speech they’ve used is correctly punctuated prior to publication.
Pupils should be taught to read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.Children should be given time every day for Class Sharing and Author’s Chair. This is an opportunity for them to share their compositions with their friends and the class.

In addition, teachers should set up a routine for writing time which ensures children have time to write in silence and a time to review what they’ve been crafting with their peers. 
Pupils should be taught to organise paragraphs around a theme and in non-narratives use simple organisational devices.Our Big Book Of Mini-Lessons provides teachers with a whole host of planning strategies which suit a range of genres. In addition, all our non-fiction Class Writing Projects come with a Planning Grid which showcases the typical paragraph organisation of popular non-fiction genres.

Again, our Big Book Of Mini-Lessons has a chapter devoted to Organisation & Structure mini-lessons. 

Finally, all our non-fiction Class Writing Projects come with a variety of lessons on the topic of organisational devices. Children are expected to use and apply any taught mini-lesson (independently) during that day’s writing time.
Pupils should learn how they can extend their range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions.

Pupils should be taught to compose sentences orally, progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures.
Children are taught lessons from our Sentence-Level Instruction publication. Children are expected to use and apply what they’ve just been taught during writing time.
Pupils should develop their understanding of how to use nouns and pronouns for clarity, cohesion and to avoid repetition.Multiple proof-reading sessions are planned for during Class Writing Projects. During these sessions, children systematically proof-read their books prior to publication using a process called CUPS. This includes sessions devoted to checking for capitalisation, use of vocabulary (including their noun/pronoun use), punctuation and spelling.
Pupils should develop their understanding of how to use fronted adverbials, conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause.

Pupils develop their understanding of how to use commas after fronted adverbials.

Pupils develop their understanding of how to use possessive apostrophes with plural nouns. 
Teachers teach lessons using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during writing time.
Pupils should be taught to edit their writing by making changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency.

Pupils should be taught to proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.
Multiple proof-reading sessions are planned for during Class Writing Projects. During these sessions, children systematically proof-read their books prior to publication using a process called CUPS. This includes sessions devoted to checking for capitalisation, use of vocabulary, punctuation and spelling.
Pupils should develop their understanding of how they can use the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense.Teachers teach lessons using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during writing time.
Pupils should be taught to use further prefixes and suffixes, use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary, spell further homophones, and spell words that are often misspelt.
Children are supplied with electronic spell checkers, common word dictionaries, and laptops/tablets with online dictionaries and./or speech recognition technology. 
In addition, common homophones are on display for children to use during daily writing time.
Pupils should be taught to use the strokes that are needed to join letters, understand which letters are best left unjoined, and increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting.Teachers provide handwriting instruction in the context of publishing sessions.

Children are expected to publish their class writing projects for audiences beyond teacher evaluation and in the process can focus on their handwriting during these publishing sessions.

During these sessions, teachers will provide whole-class handwriting instruction, resources and verbal feedback and responsive individualised instruction through Pupil-Conferencing.

Year Five & Year Six

Curriculum objectiveHow it is achieved
Pupils should be taught to identify the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting an appropriate genre.Teachers should ensure that any new Class Writing Project starts with a Writing Study week (also called a Genre Week). During this week, children should consider who the audience is going to be for their writing and who they are going to publish/perform to. This should be for a purpose beyond their teacher’s evaluation. To help, our Class Writing Projects come with a Publishing Menu which can help teachers and pupils decide who they should write for and why. 

In addition, Personal Writing Projects provide children with an opportunity to select, for themselves, a purpose, audience and genre for their own writing.

During these discussions, the class should produce a list of Product Goals (also called success criteria). These goals will reflect what the children think they need to do and include to write the best texts possible. 

This list of Product Goals should inform the future writing lessons the teacher plans to teach for the project.
Pupils should be taught to use other similar writing as models for their own.Teachers should ensure that any new Class Writing Project starts with a Writing Study week (also called a Genre Week). During this week, children should read and discuss a variety of mentor trade books and exemplar texts which match the kind of writing they are about to do. 

During these discussions, the class should produce a list of Product Goals (also called success criteria). These goals will reflect what the children think they need to do and include to write the best texts possible. 

This list of Product Goals should inform the future writing lessons the teacher plans to teach for the project. And during the revision stage of a class writing project, the teacher should turn these Product Goals into a Revision Checklist. Children should be given a session(s) to ensure that their text has either included all the goals listed or else they have tried them out on their Revision & Trying Things Out Page. 
Pupils should be taught to consider how authors have developed characters and settings in what they have read, listened to or seen performed.We have a clear vision of progression for children’s narrative writing. This can be seen in our Writing Development Scales & Assessment Framework publication. 
Importantly, all our narrative Class Writing Projects come with a series of literary lessons which help children create settings, characters and plot in their narratives. These lessons should be used and applied (independently) by children during writing time.
Pupils should draw on their reading and research where necessary.In our narrative Class Writing Projects children are taught about the process of Intertextuality. This is when writers generate their own ideas in response to their reading. Our projects provide a number of strategies children can use and apply Intertextuality. These lessons should be used and applied (independently) by children during writing time.

In addition, our Class Writing Projects come with a list of recommended trade mentor books and exemplar texts for children to draw inspiration from.

Our non-fiction Class Writing Projects encourage children to draw on, use and cite what they’ve researched.
Pupils should revise their writing by assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing.Teachers should plan sessions where children are taught revision mini-lessons. Children are expected to use and apply a taught mini-lesson during writing time.

Teachers should ensure that children always leave their right-hand page free as their Revision & Trying Things Out Page.

In addition, teachers should turn the Product Goals for a class writing project into a Revision Checklist for children to use. Children should ensure that their composition includes all the things on the checklist or else they have given it a try on their Revision & Trying Things Out Page.

Finally, teachers will regularly suggest how children could try things out and make revisions to their writing through their daily Pupil-Conferencing.
Pupils should be taught to describe settings, characters and create atmosphere in their narratives. We have a clear vision of progression for children’s narrative writing. This can be seen in our Writing Development Scales & Assessment Framework publication. 
Importantly, all our narrative Class Writing Projects come with a series of literary lessons which help children create settings, characters and atmosphere in their narratives. These lessons should be used and applied (independently) by children during writing time.
Pupils should integrate dialogue into their narratives to convey character and advance the action.Teachers teach lessons about using and punctuating speech using our Functional Grammar Lessons and Big Book Of Mini-Lessons publications. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during writing time.
Pupils should be taught to select appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how suchchoices can change and enhance meaning.Teachers teach lessons about grammar and word choice by using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during writing time.

In addition, children are encouraged to experiment with grammar and vocabulary by using their Revision & Trying Things Out Page and word choices strategies.
Pupils should be taught to perform their compositions using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement.Children should be given time every day for Class Sharing and Author’s Chair. This is an opportunity for them to share their compositions with their friends and the class.

In addition, teachers should set up a routine for writing time which ensures children have time to write in silence and a time to review what they’ve been crafting with their peers. 
Pupils should be taught to use a wide range of organisational and presentational devices and build cohesion within and across paragraphs.Our Big Book Of Mini-Lessons provides teachers with a whole host of planning strategies which are suited to a range of genres. In addition, all our non-fiction Class Writing Projects come with a Planning Grid which showcases the typical paragraph organisation of popular non-fiction genres. 

Again, our Big Book Of Mini-Lessons has a chapter devoted to Organisation & Structure mini-lessons. 

Finally, all our non-fiction Class Writing Projects come with a variety of lessons on the topic of organisational devices. Children are expected to use and apply any taught mini-lesson (independently) during that day’s writing time.
Pupils should be taught to revise their compositions when there is an opportunity to enhance its effect and clarify meaning.Teachers should plan sessions where children are taught revision mini-lessons. Children are expected to use and apply a taught mini-lesson during writing time.

Teachers should ensure that children always leave their right-hand page free as their Revision & Trying Things Out Page.

In addition, teachers should turn the Product Goals for a Class Writing Project into a Revision Checklist for children to use. Children should ensure that their composition includes all the things on the checklist or else they have shown how they tried it out on their Revision & Trying Things Out Page.

Finally, teachers will regularly suggest how children could try things out and make revisions to their writing through their daily Pupil-Conferencing.
Pupils should develop their understanding of formal writing and appropriate register by using certain vocabulary and structures.Our Class Writing Projects ensure that children have to write for a variety of different people and for different reasons. This includes writing formally. For example, our Advocacy Journalism, Community Activism, Historical Account, Science Report, Discussion and Explanation projects all encourage children to write in a register in keeping with ‘formal writing’.
Pupils should develop their understanding of: the perfect form of verbs, passive voice, expanded noun phrases, modal verbs, subjunctive mood and relative clauses.Teachers teach lessons about the passive voice, expanded noun phrases, modal verbs, subjunctive mood and relative clauses using our Functional Grammar Lessons publication. Children are expected to use and apply (independently) what they’ve just been taught during writing time.
Pupils should ensure consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.Multiple proof-reading sessions are planned for during Class Writing Projects. During these sessions, children systematically proof-read their books prior to publication using a process called CUPS. This includes sessions devoted to checking for capitalisation, use of vocabulary (including consistent use of tense), punctuation and spelling.
Pupils should be taught to proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Pupils should be taught to indicate grammatical and other features by using: commas to clarify meaning; hyphens to avoid ambiguity; brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis; semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses; a colon to introduce a list and punctuate bullet points consistently.
Multiple proof-reading sessions are planned for during Class Writing Projects. During these sessions, children systematically proof-read their books prior to publication using a process called CUPS. This includes sessions devoted to checking for capitalisation, use of vocabulary, punctuation and spelling.
Pupils should be taught to write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed.Teachers provide handwriting instruction in the context of publishing sessions. Children are expected to publish their class writing projects for audiences beyond teacher evaluation and in the process can focus on their handwriting during these publishing sessions.

During these publishing sessions, teachers will provide whole-class handwriting instruction, resources and verbal feedback and responsive individualised instruction through Pupil-Conferencing.
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